8 Ways Low Cholesterol Levels Harm Your Health

By | February 23, 2019

Low cholesterol risk factors, and symptoms, include: depression, cancer, Parkinson disease, and our grandparents loss of the ability, to fight and recover, from illness, says evidence.  Cholesterol and water are both needed for the good health of your body,  and for the good health of the land your live on.

Cholesterol and Water are Vital for Life

8 Ways Low Cholesterol Levels Harm Your Health : A list of Risk Factors

  • 1 a – Increased Death Rates in the Elderly
  • 1 b – Rapidly Declining Health in Elderly Men and Woman
  • 1 c – An Early Signal of Death in the Elderly
  • 2 a – High Cholesterol Lessens Risk of Getting Parkinson Disease
  • 2 b – Low Cholesterol Linked to an Increased Risk Parkinson Disease
  • 3 – An Increase in Cancer Tumor Size
  • 4 – Men Getting Prostate Cancer
  • 5 – An Increased Occurrence of You Getting Cancer Again
  • 6 – Your Brain Bleeding and You Having a Stroke
  • 7 a – An Increase of Depression
  • 7 b – An Increase of Depression in Women
  • 8 – Suicide and Depression in War Veterans

8 Ways Low Cholesterol Levels Harms Your Health – Here is the Evidence:

1 a.  – Low Cholesterol Increases Death Rates in Elderly

Lower blood cholesterol concentrations lessen the survival chance in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) say this 2000 research published in the US National Medical Library

1 b.  – Cholesterol Lower Than 189mg/dl (4.9 mmol/L) Signals Rapidly Declining Health in Elderly People

If your total cholesterol levels are lower than 189mg/dl (4.9 mmol/L) you have a higher risk of dying even when many other related factors have been taken into account. 4521 elderly Italian men and women aged 65-84 years had vital information recorded between the years 1992 – 1995. This study was published in 2003 in the US National Medical Library

1 c.  – More Deaths Happen in Grandparents When Total Cholesterol is Low

This 12-year follow-up study of older adults reviewed research where the authors used different methods of analyzing the information. One researcher analyzed a group of home-dwelling elderly for 6 years and found more deaths occurred when their total cholesterol was low. Overall results of this study reinforced the role that low total cholesterol was an indicator of higher mortality (death) risk when other health problems were excluded  say The Scientific World Journal

2.  – Low Total Cholesterol Below 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dl) Increased Risk of Parkinson’ Disease by 58%

Cholesterol is a vital structural component of the cell membranes of your brain, and the entire nervous system located in your brain. LEARN about What is Cholesterol New Research and 9 ways cholesterol is needed by your body.

The Rotterdam Study  involved 6465 people aged over 55 years. At the start of this study they were all examined – then were re-examined 9.4 years later. It was discovered that higher total cholesterol levels, were associated with a lower number of the women members of the group developing Parkinson’s disease. Here are the surprising findings of the Rotterdam study published in The Oxford Academic American Journal of Epidemiology 2006:

TOTAL CHOLESTEROL LEVELS:

  • BELOW 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 58%
  • BETWEEN 6.1 – 6.8 mmol/L (110 – 122 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 46%
  • BETWEEN 6.8 – 7.0 mmol/L (122 – 126 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 16%

2 b.  – “Low Cholesterol Levels Linked with Higher Risk of Parkinson’s disease” 

In 2007 the United Kingdom newspaper, The Guardian, raised concerns about the increasing numbers of aging Britain’s being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. When it wrote this headline: “Low Cholesterol Levels Linked with Higher Risk of Parkinson’s disease.” The article began with this paragraph: “Scientists are to investigate why people with low cholesterol levels appear to be more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, following concerns that statins (drug medicines name) – given to control cholesterol – could cause an increase in the number of people with the illness.”

3.  – Low cholesterol Levels Are linked to Cancer Tumours Increasing in Size

Science has found that cholesterol lowering medication is linked to tumours increasing in size, when they are already present in your body. “Recent evidence indicates that products in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway affect DNA replication and cell proliferation. These findings suggests a mechanism by which cholesterol lowering might accelerate the development of tumors already initiated. The data that have been reviewed in no way suggest that treatment of hypercholesterolemia should not be pursued ” say the US National Library of Medicine.

Even the Mayo clinic, the prestigious medical business on the first page on most Google searches has written that low LDL cholesterol is linked to you getting cancer.

4.  – Low Cholesterol, High Physical Fitness and Low BMI (Body-Mass-Index) Are Linked to Prostate Cancer.

This study in 1997 of healthy Norwegian men aged 40-50 years began in 1972-1975 and was followed up throughout 2012. Cancer data was taken from the Cancer Registry of Norway and cause of death was obtained from the Cause of Death Registry of Norway. 

These findings conflict with the current medical prostate cancer prevention recommendations.

5.  – Low Cholesterol Levels Are Linked to Increased Occurrence of Cancer

A 1988 study of 39,268 men and women aged 15-99 years, who were at the start free of cancer, had a 10 year follow-up. It was found that those with low cholesterol levels had an increased occurrence of cancer.

6. – Low Cholesterol Levels Are Linked to Increase of Stroke Risk

Research published in 2013 that reviewed 23 studies involving 1,430,141 people explained the links of cholesterol levels to the occurrence of strokes. The study concluded that low levels of total cholesterol are linked to an increased risk of you having a stroke. Higher levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were linked to a lower risk of stroke.

The USA Mayo Clinic has written that low LDL cholesterol is linked to hemorrahagic stroke. This happens when weakened blood vessels burst and bleed into your brain. Other names you may be familiar with are: intracerbral hemorrhage or cerebral bleed.

7 a.  – Low Cholesterol is Linked to Depression

The Mayo clinic  links low LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol to depression. -(accessed 26th Jan 2017)

 7 b. – Low triglycerides and low total cholesterol are also linked to increased rates of depression in women

Research published  in 1999 in the US National Library of Medicine say: healthy young adult women with low triglycerides and low total cholesterol experienced depression and anxiety. These findings were independent of age, body mass index, physical activity and other factors known to influence fat concentrations.

8. – Depression and Suicide Are Risks Linked to Low Cholesterol Levels in Male War Veterans

4500 US war veterans were studied for 15 years. Researchers found that the men with depression and low total cholesterol were 7 more times likely to die prematurely of an accident or suicide than the other men in the study.

CONCLUSION

8 Ways Low Cholesterol Levels Harm Your Health: Risk Factors List

Total Low Cholesterol Levels, cause the following serious eight health problems in your body. 

  • 1 a – Increased Death Rates in the Elderly
  • 1 b – Rapidly Declining Health in Elderly Men and Woman
  • 1 c – An Early Signal of Death in the Elderly
  • 2 a – High Cholesterol Lessens Risk of Getting Parkinson Disease
  • 2 b – Low Cholesterol Linked to an Increased Risk Parkinson Disease
  • 3 – An Increase in Cancer Tumor Size
  • 4 – Men Getting Prostate Cancer
  • 5 – An Increased Occurrence of You Getting Cancer Again
  • 6 – Your Brain Bleeding and You Having a Stroke
  • 7 a – An Increase of Depression
  • 7 b – An Increase of Depression in Women
  • 8 – Suicide and Depression in War Veterans

To learn more about the vital role cholesterol has in your body check out these titles here:

What is Cholesterol – NEW Research

Does Your Body Make Cholesterol? Science Says YES

9 Ways Cholesterol is Needed By Your Body

 

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10 thoughts on “8 Ways Low Cholesterol Levels Harm Your Health

  1. Steve

    Hi
    Thanks for a very enlightening article. I’ve always lived a very healthy lifestyle and was under the impression that high cholesterol levels were unhealthy. These studies show that this is not always the case. My question is: what is the safest cholesterol level for us to have? If low cholesterol levels are not healthy for us, what about very high cholesterol levels are they also unhealthy? I guess it just a matter of having the right balance of cholesterol for good health.
    Regards
    Steve

    Reply
    1. Citizen Science by RJ

      Hey Steve, the industry of disinformation around cholesterol is endemic. Here are some links with more evidence: https://cholesteroldetectives.com/what-is-cholesterol-new-research/https://cholesteroldetectives.com/does-your-body-make-cholesterol-science-says-yes/- https://cholesteroldetectives.com/9-ways-cholesterol-is-needed-by-your-body/. These post EXPLAIN with medical references: What Cholesterol is, Where it is made, and its vital functions in your body. Thanks visiting

      Reply
  2. Jay

    I did read somewhere that having low cholesterol level is better than having a high cholesterol level and low cholesterol levels are dangerous only when extremely low. Is this actually true?

    Reply
    1. Citizen Science by RJ

      Hey Jay thanks for dropping by. According to the 8 medical references extremely low cholesterol levels: INCREASE death rate in elderly, INCREASES men risk of prostate cancer, INCREASES cancers tumor sizes, INCREASES depression, INCREASES suicide in War Veterans, INCREASE Parkinson’s in the brain. Cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, inflammation is – cholesterol is a decoy making $billions for industry. Meanwhile weak and sick people with low cholesterol levels are getting worse and lose the ability to live. Thanks Jay

      Reply
  3. Greg

    Hi,

    Love your article! It is a definite eye opening article and goes to show how important cholesterol is to our health. You’ve also shown it isn’t always bad to have high cholesterol levels.

    You can correct me if I am wrong but I believe it has been proven that it isn’t necessary cholesterol that puts us at risk of heart disease.

    I do have a question for you. You talk mainly about cholesterol and very little about the two different kinds of cholesterol. There is such thing as a good cholesterol (HDL) and a bad cholesterol (LDL). When you talk about low cholesterol and high cholesterol are you referring to a specific cholesterol or a combined cholesterol level?

    Love the information for sure!

    I am very interested in health also.

    Reply
    1. admin

      Hi Greg, You’ve made me so happy that your have found my article eye-opening. What I’ve not made clear is that ‘Inflammation NOT cholesterol” causes heart disease. Low TOTAL cholesterol evidence shows harms our body in many, many ways. And yes, it is Low Total Cholesterol and High Total Cholesterol that I’m referring to. Thanks for your valuable feedback. I’ll make this post much clearer.

      Reply
  4. Todd P Matthews

    This is an excellent article that not many are aware of. We always hear that high cholesterol is bad for our health but never hear of low cholesterol being bad for our health. I’ve always lived by the notion too much of anything is bad for you and on the flip side, too little of anything is bad for you.

    Those who are under that notion that cholesterol is the bad guy should give this article a look. It reminds me of the fat scare that lasted for a decade when the medical community made all forms of fat like some kind monster, which too little fat intake as well can be harmful to one’s health.

    Reply
    1. admin

      Brilliant, brilliant Todd, you’ve got it! Interestingly the FAT scare is still being promoted by Medical website, and the entire Health Care systems in many countries.

      Reply
  5. Derek Marshall

    Excellent article.

    Low cholesterol levels also mean low hormone levels as our body needs cholesterol in order to make hormones. The goal is no “no cholesterol” but to have healthy levels of this fat-based protein.

    Reply
    1. Citizen Science by RJ

      Hey Derek, Thank you for giving me feedback on https://cholesteroldetectives.com/8-ways-low-cholesterol-levels-harm-your-health/. Yes, low cholesterol levels also mean low hormone levels. This foundation article: https://cholesteroldetectives.com/what-is-cholesterol-new-research/ is evidence based. Cholesterol is an essential steroid fat made in the body by this process: https://cholesteroldetectives.com/does-your-body-make-cholesterol-science-says-yes/.
      What do you mean by “the goal is no “no cholesterol” but to have healthy levels of this fat-based protein?

      Reply

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