What Is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol

By | September 16, 2019

Cholesterol is a cornerstone ingredient that is vital for the health of our brain, nerve cells, sex hormones, stress hormones, the fat-based vitamin A, D, E & K levels, aldosterone (the electrolyte & salt balance hormone, and bile (the substance that emulsifies and breaks down fat, & helps with the absorption of the fat-based vitamins, A, D, E & K). What is cholesterol? Understanding cholesterol is to help you to discover the ‘real deal’ about cholesterol.

Global Cholesterol-Lowering Drug Market 2017 is Very Profitable

The size of the cholesterol-lowering drug market is $19.2 billion in 2017.

A REPORT on “how medical businesses can exploit the future business opportunities emerging, can be read at ‘Global Information, Inc‘.

What is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol

“Cholesterol is the raw ingredient for your sex hormones, testosterone, progesterone, and estrogen. Without cholesterol, your adrenal glands would fail. And the pleasure of sex, relationships, and children would not exist. “Cholesterol is vital for homeostasis (bringing the body back into balance) and it is essential for life (without cholesterol you die)” says Chapter 2, Chemistry Comes Alive, page 46-47 of the Tenth Edition of Human Anatomy & Physiology by Marieb and Hoehn.

Cholesterol is the Structural Ingredient That Makes Our Steroid Hormones

Cholesterol is the precursor of the 5 classes of steroid hormones. The following image is simple but has a complicated title. This is in ‘medical research biochemistry’ language.

“The Biosynthetic Relationship of Classes of Steroid Hormones and Cholesterolis available to be browsed at the US National Library of Medicine.

Biosynthetic relationships mean simple processes are turned into more complex processes.

Biosynthetic Relationship of Classes of Steroid Hormones and Cholesterol – How Steroid Sex Hormones Are Made?

Cholesterol is the Precursor Ingredient

EXPLANATION of How Steroid Sex Hormones Are Made:

Look firstly at the name Cholesterol (C27) which starts at the top. This proves that cholesterol is the main ingredient in our bodies that make the 5 Steroid hormones. They are colored purple/red in this image. This links down to Pregnenolone (C21), and then to the Progestagens, (the female sex hormone progesterone is made here). The Androgens make the male sex hormone Testosterone and the female Estrogens. Mineralocorticoids named in the center, make Aldosterone which regulates your body’s salt and electrolytes via urine from your bladder and the kidneys. Glucocorticoids make Cortisol which regulates stress.

Understanding That Cholesterol Makes Hormones in Our Body

The www.researchgate.net/ image does not include the fat category type, known as steroids in the title

“How Hormones Are Made in Your Body.” This is why I have shown you the earlier image called “The Biosynthetic Relationship of Classes of Steroid Hormones and Cholesterol.”

How Hormones Are Made in Our Body (*)

What is cholesterol

How Sex Hormones Are Made in Your Body

EXPLANATION of How Sex Hormones Are Made in Our Body

Start with Cholesterol at the top, then link down to PROGESTERON – go to blue TESTOSTERONE, then ESTRADIOL (E2) and ESTRONE (E1) which are known as the ESTROGEN’S.

Is Cholesterol A Steroid Fat?

EVIDENCE #1.

“The single most important molecule in your steroid chemistry is cholesterol

“Structurally, steroids differ quite a bit from fats and oils. Steroids are basically fat molecules made of four interlocking hydrocarbon rings.  Like triglycerides, steroids are fat-soluble and contain little oxygen. “says Chapter 2, Chemistry Comes Alive, Page 47, Tenth Edition of Human Anatomy & Physiology, Marieb, and Hoehn. (*)

EVIDENCE #2.

“All steroids have the same basic skeletons and the chemical differences between them are slight.” But despite there being little chemical difference these steroid hormones are powerful and regulate a wide range of your body’s functions” says Chapter 18, Endocrine disease, Page 1048, 5th Edition, Clinical Medicine. Kumar & Clark, W.B. Saunders.

EVIDENCE #3.

An Image of the Chemical Composition of Steroid Fats (*)

What is Cholesterol

What Cholesterol’s Family of Steroid Fats Look Like

Underneath each of the 6 chemical formulations is the name of the steroid fat hormone. Starting at the top row, left to right, are the names, cortisol & corticosterone which are anti-inflammatory & stress hormones. Next is aldosterone which regulates electrolyte & salt balance.

The second row contains the names, progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone. These are our steroid sex hormones.

EVIDENCE #4.

An Image of What VLDL, LDL and HDL and Lipoproteins Look Like

Image of a lipoprotein

What HDL & LDL Lipoproteins Look Like

VLDL, LDL & HDL and other family members are NOT made of just cholesterol. Lipoproteins are made in our liver from triglycerides, protein, phospholipids, fat-soluble vitamins, free cholesterol, and cholesterol bound in fatty acids. This detailed image is from Mosby’s Medical Dictionary, 9th Edition. (*)

  • Compare the images for steroid fats, and the one of a lipoprotein.
  • Have you noticed that the lipoprotein image contains building block ingredients, Triglycerides, Protein, Phospholipids, Free cholesterol and Cholesterol bound to fatty acids (other fats)?

What is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol: Medical Studies Confirm Low Total Cholesterol Weakens Us

Do low total cholesterol levels enhance the health and longevity of our elderly vulnerable relatives?

STUDY # 1.

Low total cholesterol causes early death in vulnerable Elderly

If our Grandparents live longer if their total cholesterol levels are higher than 189mg/dl (4.9

Our Grandparents live longer if their total cholesterol levels are higher than:

  • 189mg/dl (4.9 mmol/L) even when many other related factors have been taken into account.

PUT ANOTHER WAY – Your grandparents die sooner if their total cholesterol levels are lower than 189mg/dl (4.9 mmol/L) even when many other related factors have been taken into account say the US National Library of Medicine in 2003.

 STUDY # 2.

Low total cholesterol is a sign more elderly adults die

A 12-year follow-up study of 800 people aged 60 – 85 years old were treated at two geriatric clinics in the city of Londrina, Brazil. Starting measurements were taken from June/1997 to July/1998. End measurements in March/2010. TO QUOTE the findings:

  • “The results indicate higher mortality (death) among older people with lower levels of total cholesterol.”
  • “The results did not show a positive association between high total cholesterol levels (hyperlipidemia) and death (all-cause mortality).”

This study published in The Scientific World Journal found that there is a higher rate of death from low total cholesterol levels. And no deaths recorded from high total cholesterol levels.

STUDY # 3.

Low cholesterol levels increase our risk of Parkinson’s

High total cholesterol levels decrease our risk of developing Parkinson’s Disease.

Cholesterol is a vital structural component of the cell membranes of our brain, and the entire nervous system located in our brain.

The Rotterdam Study involved 6465 people aged over 55 years. At the start of this study they were all examined – then were re-examined 9.4 years later. It was discovered that higher total cholesterol levels, were linked to a lower number of the women members of the group developing Parkinson’s disease say The Oxford Academic American Journal of Epidemiology published the finding in 2006

Here are the surprising findings of the Rotterdam study that doctors, nurses, and the whole medical health system are NOT telling us:

TOTAL CHOLESTEROL LEVELS:

Below 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 58%

Between 6.1 – 6.8 mmol/L (110 – 122 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 46%

Between 6.8 – 7.0 mmol/L (122 – 126 mg/dl) increased Parkinson risk by 16%

Are low total cholesterol level deaths, hidden within the health system, when vulnerable patients die?

What is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol: Confirms HDL and LDL May Be Part of Our Immune System

Let’s look at the image of a Lipoprotein again.

An Image of What VLDL, LDL and HDL and Lipoproteins Look Like

Image of a lipoprotein

What HDL & LDL Lipoproteins Look Like

A QUOTE from the evidence published in the US National Library of Medicine in 2010 says this:

 “Plasma lipoproteins (VLD, LDL, Lp[a} and HDL) function primarily in lipid transport among tissues and organs. However, cumulative evidence suggests that lipoproteins may also prevent bacterial, viral, and parasite infections and are therefore a component of innate immunity. Lipoproteins can also detoxify lipopolysaccharides and Lipoteichoic acid. Infections can induce oxidation of LDL, and oxLDL, in turn, plays important anti-infective roles and protects against endotoxin-induced tissue damage. Therefore, it is also evidence that apo(a) is protective against pathogens. Taken together, the evidence suggests that it might be valuable to induce the concept that plasma lipoproteins belong in the realm of host immune response.”

 What does this mean and why is it important for us to learn?

The above quote published in the US National Library of Medicine in 2010 says this about lipoproteins:

#1. Lipoproteins are a transport system among the tissues and organs of our body

#2. Lipoproteins may prevent bacterial, viral, and parasite infections

#3. Lipoproteins are a part of our innate immune system – the front line soldiers, the first defenders against invading pathogens say the US National Library of Medicine.

#4. Lipoproteins detoxify lipopolysaccharides and Lipoteichoic acid

#5. Infections damage LDL by an oxidation process

#6. Do lipoproteins belong to our immune system?

#7. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are signals like attachments, attached to bacteria, viruses, and parasites. LPS warn our first line of defense immune systems soldiers, that your body has harmful invaders says the US National Library of Medicine

 # 8. Lipoteichoic acid is similar to LPS and triggers the release of some of our immune systems white blood cells so it can carry out a ‘passive kill attack’ on the invaders. LPS has been found in the blood of patients who have abnormal gut bacteria (microflora) or increase the permeability of the intestinal mucosa says the US National Library of Medicine

This is commonly known as leaky gut

Understanding cholesterol means we need to learn many facts that the Conventional Pharmaceutically driven Heart Health System, will never tell us:

Stop Fearing Cholesterol and Make It Your Friend Says Top Cardiologist

Stop Fearing Cholesterol and Make It Your Friend Says Top Cardiologist

What is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol: Conclusion

Cholesterol is a cornerstone ingredient that is vital for the health of our brain, nerve cells, sex hormones, stress hormones, the fat-based vitamin A, D, E & K levels, aldosterone (the electrolyte & salt balance hormone, and bile (the substance that emulsifies and breaks down fat, & helps with the absorption of the fat-based vitamins, A, D, E & K). What is cholesterol? Understanding cholesterol is to help you to discover the ‘real deal’ about cholesterol.

 Cholesterol is the precursor of the 5 classes of steroid hormones.

 Medical Studies Confirm Total Cholesterol is Not the Issue

  • Low total cholesterol causes early death in vulnerable Elderly
  • Low total cholesterol is a sign more elderly adults die
  • Low cholesterol levels increase our risk of Parkinson’s

Are low total cholesterol level deaths, hidden within the health system, when vulnerable patients die?

Medical science confirms HDL and LDL cholesterol is a transport system and may be part of our immune system

 

Let’s hear what you think

Please place comments below

 

Citizen Science by RJ an Evidence-Based Investigator

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “What Is Cholesterol? Understanding Cholesterol

  1. Travis Hendrix

    Very interesting post, I have always though cholesterol was a bad thing! Although if you have too much cholesterol that is still a bad thing correct? How do you stay in the middle?

    Reply
  2. March

    This was very informative and helpful to know and I think everyone and anyone can benefit from knowing these facts.

    Reply
    1. RJ Post author

      Hey March,
      I’m pleased you found this informative.
      What part of this information has helped you?

      RJ

      Reply
  3. Kelyee

    Wow, a very educational read. I, like someone, said, thought cholesterol is a bad thing. Too much can lead to heart disease and too little can actually cause harm.

    I have the same question how do we stay in the middle? Is it just easting healthy? Because I have always had higher than normal cholesterol even when I was active in high school.

    But my doctor is always telling me that I will die sooner then expected if I don’t have my cholesterol in check.

    Plus I’m allergic to statins!

    Reply
    1. RJ Post author

      Hey Kelyee,
      It is NOT about staying in the middle!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      A CHANGE in our drug intensive medical system is NEEDED – see these posts:
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/8-high-cholesterol-myths-vs-facts-new-research/
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/9-ways-low-cholesterol-levels-harm-your-health/
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/what-is-inflammation-in-the-body/
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/what-is-the-cause-heart-disease-12-links/
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/inflammation-not-cholesterol-causes-heart-disease/
      https://cholesteroldetectives.com/natural-anti-inflammatory-diet-plan-in-6-steps/

      RJ

      Reply
  4. Eco_Catherine

    Hi there,

    I had absolutely no idea what cholesterol actually was, or how important it was, until I read this article.
    Thank you so much for your detailed information.

    Reply
    1. RJ Post author

      Hi Eco_Catherine,
      YEA – It is very pleasing for me, that you understand how important cholesterol is – This MAKES my HEART sing!!!!!!!!!!!

      RJ

      Reply

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